Posted tagged ‘Dogs’

The “BOO” books by J.H. Lee

November 26, 2013

What are the most popular books in the CPS Library lately?  The “Boo” books by J.H. Lee.  Basically they are pictures with captions of this adorable Pomeranian who has been groomed to look like a teddy bear:

When Bella, a second grade student, asked me if I had any books “about the dog who looks like a teddy bear”, I went to the internet and quickly found what she was talking about.  I now have two copies of each of the books, and they are checked out the minute they come back.  Sometimes it’s nice to just enjoy a picture book that make you say “awwwwww” on every page.

THE FAST AND THE FURRIEST by Andy Behrens

June 11, 2011

Here’s a winner for all you dog lovers out there. Kevin Pugh is a 12-year-old  couch potato: his favorite things are eating, watching tv, and playing video games. Kevin’s father used to be a star player for the Chicago Bears, and he would really like his son to do something more athletic than play video games.  To please his father, Kevin agrees to go to  football summer camp with humorous and disastrous results.    When Kevin’s pudgy, lazy dog Cromwell sees a dog agility contest on tv one day, everything changes for the Pugh family. Cromwell suddenly wants to go for walks all the time, leap over hurdles, and run and jump through tire swings:  maybe Kevin has finally found the motivation to get off the couch.  Can Cromwell become the athlete?  Will Kevin’s father ever lighten up? Read this humorous, suspenseful book about a boy’s summer of change.

Sheep by Valerie Hobbs

October 5, 2009

urlIt was a good weekend for reading. I fired up the stove and settled in Saturday to read Sheep by Valerie Hobbs. For all you dog lovers out there, this is a great short novel about a very intelligent border collie who is trying to do what’s he’s good at, which is herd sheep. As a young pup, Jack is so proud and excited to be a sheepherder, but his life is turned upside down when the ranch burns. He goes through many owners, has many adventures, and is always seeking a place where he has “the deep down good feeling that you were making a difference.” He doesn’t want to be a “fetch the slippers” kind of dog; he wants to do what he believes in, what he was meant to do. The story is told from the dog’s point of view, and you really feel like you understand the way a dog thinks. With courage and determination, he searches for a life of meaning. For a short time, he’s called Blackie. To the Goat Man, he’s Shep. To Hollerin, he’s Spot. He’d like to forget that he was called Sparky, which is the name Billy the circus man calls him when he reaches for the whip. Find out how this clever and hopeful dog finally finds the name “Jack”, a home, and a purpose in life. If you liked Lassie Come-Home and Black Beauty, this is an adventurous animal story in that same vein.